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Stevo – Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix) Is One Of The Best Tunes

By Wilma Stephens / Published on Thursday, 10 Dec 2020 12:33 PM / No Comments / 12941 views

Stevo – Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix) Is One Of The Best Tunes

NEW YORK (RichTMX.com) – Stevo, one of the pioneers of electronic dance music, has announced his new version of ‘Mama India’ in three decades with the remix by the DJ Superstar StoneBridge from Stockholm. Stevo said that his track Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix), to be released early December, will feature a collaboration with DJ Delani and is the house track of the year. Acclaimed as one of the greatest remixes of all time by the DJs, Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix) is driven by a pulsating house beat. It manages to stay true to the spirit of the original, and StoneBridge`s Mix of Mama India is the house track of the year? That can’t be right – can it? Well, let me tell you it is right. In fact, nothing else even came close – this is an house anthem that will be around for many moons.

Stevo Triumphantly Returns With Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix)

Originally released a while back, ‘Mama India’ is an excellent, spacey, percussive track complete with rolling bassline, one of the trippiest techno records ever made. One of the defining techno tracks of Manchester’s Hacienda club in the ’90s, even the late German DJ and music producer Torsten Fenslau finished his sets in Dorian Gray with ‘Mama India’ and everyone from DJ Stevie B. to Sven Väth spanked the fuck out of it. Stevo and DJ Delani together with the legendary producer Klaus Munzert had twisted ‘Mama India’ into a proper Balearic, late-night magic techno moment. Klaus Munzert played a pretty important role in the world of German club culture. Munzert´s production work on various dance projects set a new benchmark in the electronic dance genre in Germany back then. Stevo – ‘Mama India’ was discovered and signed by the music industry legend Andy Zahradnik.

The impression left by ‘Mama India’ was certainly felt by the clubbing masses, as the debut single from Stevo was belted out across the New York’s finest clubs. With his distinct brand of deep house, throbbing with life and dark energy, Stevo triumphantly returns with Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix) under which he defined the sound of techno. DJs and music producers have become the superstars of popular dance music, so the time feels right again for Mama India [Reloaded].

Dark & Noisy Is The Order Of The Day

Mama India [Reloaded] is one of the best tunes of 2020, and if you don’t know it yet, you soon will because this is yet another example of great house music. The fat bass of Stevo’s latest, Mama India [Reloaded] named dancefloor killer exist somewhere between the worlds of house, techno and electro. The “Mama India” vocal is then introduced as it erupts into a frenzied climax. Dark and noisy is the order of the day as the table drum is fused with sinister FX and nasty stabs – hardcore, man. Stockholm’s energetically prolific house producer StoneBridge allies himself with Stevo for a pumping house remix combination. In an effort to capture an underground vibe that has funky appeal, they have ended up with an intense, forceful soundscape. Mama India [Reloaded] is the global language that everyone understands without the need for translation. Stevo, aka Rain Man 雨男 [T.A.A.K.A.S.], is one of the original pioneers of the techno and electro scene and his music is incredible – he strives to push the boundaries of innovation with every new project.

Swedish DJ Superstar StoneBridge

One of the pioneers of house music, the Swedish DJ and record producer StoneBridge won international renown with the remix of the 1993 hit ‘Show Me Love.’ StoneBridge’s iconic remix of Robin S ‘Show Me Love’ became one of the biggest selling house music tracks of all time. StoneBridges’s remix of Mama India by Stevo is fantastic and features a funky, incessant groove, a rolling bassline and the vocals sample of Mama India. A well crafted, tech-edged slice of house and more progressive-based brilliance from StoneBridge. It’s wonderfully laden with great house sounds. StoneBridge is the man right now in house circles. Go to any city anywhere in the world and you’re guaranteed to hear a load of StoneBridge tracks.

Funk-Infected Groove Stealthily Creep Up Before Delivering A Fatal Body Blow

Stevo – Mama India [Reloaded] (StoneBridge Mix) is everything a modern house track should be: engaging, innovative and, frequently, beautiful. The unmistakable drum programming, dark, sinister sounds and funk-infected groove stealthily creep up before delivering a fatal body blow. After all, anybody with the balls, suss and ability to combine funky, percussive tech-house beats with classic Mama India vocals has to be some kind of a genius. There’s no getting away from it: the crowd just loves Mama India. Stevo is having one hell of a year 2020: “The StoneBridge remix of Mama India is the best thing to happen to me since Encore [Frenchie Rude]! Life don’t get much better than this – StoneBridge is a genius! “’It is something I have always wanted to do, fans kept reaching out to me, asking if I would ever do a new version of Mama India,’ Stevo explains. The StoneBridge mix is a funky electro take, full of electronica madness, a cool funky rhythm and gritty bass. Get ready – this is by far the biggest release yet for Area 51 Records. Boy this leaves you breathless! Sure to be huge.

Don’t miss our interview with DJ Delani

Electronic dance music (EDMis a broad range of percussive electronic music genres made largely for nightclubsraves and festivals. It is generally produced for playback by DJs who create seamless selections of tracks, called a mix, by segueing from one recording to another. EDM producers also perform their music live in a concert or festival setting in what is sometimes called a live PA.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, following the emergence of ravingpirate radios and an upsurge of interest in club culture, EDM achieved widespread mainstream popularity in Europe. In the United States at that time, acceptance of dance culture was not universal; although both electro and Chicago house music were influential both in Europe and the United States, mainstream media outlets and the record industry remained openly hostile to it. There was also a perceived association between EDM and drug culture, which led governments at state and city level to enact laws and policies intended to halt the spread of rave culture.

Subsequently, in the new millennium, the popularity of EDM increased globally, largely in Australia and the United States. By the early 2010s, the term “electronic dance music” and the initialism “EDM” was being pushed by the American music industry and music press in an effort to rebrand American rave culture. Despite the industry’s attempt to create a specific EDM brand, the initialism remains in use as an umbrella term for multiple genres, including dance-pophousetechnotrancedrum and bassdubstephardstyle, and trap, as well as their respective subgenres.

 

 

 

 

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